Lake Reflections

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  • Tropical Storm Imelda Hits Houston September 27, 2019
  • Imelda Blows Us Away September 27, 2019
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  • Whig Party
    The Whig Party was a political party formed in 1834 by opponents of President Andrew Jackson and his Jacksonian Democrats. Led by Henry Clay, the name “Whigs” was derived from the English antimonarchist party and and was an attempt to portray Jackson as "King Andrew." The Whigs were one of the two ...
  • How John F. Kennedy Overcame Anti-Catholic Bias to Win the Presidency
    On September 12, 1960, less than two months before Americans would choose the next president of the United States, Democratic candidate John F. Kennedy was in Texas giving a speech to a Houston gathering of Southern Baptist clergy. This wasn’t a normal campaign stop. Kennedy was Catholic and, at ...
  • Nazca Line Discoveries in Peru Suggest the Mysterious Geoglyphs Are Pervasive
    The famous Nazca Lines are intricate designs in the ground that cover an estimated 170 square miles in southern Peru. The large-scale etchings depicting people, animals and objects date to 2,000 years ago, when a pre-Inca civilization laid them in the Nazca Desert. Many modern researchers have ...
  • How the 'Mother of Thanksgiving' Lobbied Abraham Lincoln to Proclaim the National Holiday
    Secretary of State William Seward wrote it and Abraham Lincoln issued it, but much of the credit for the Thanksgiving Proclamation should probably go to a woman named Sarah Josepha Hale.  A prominent writer and editor, Hale had written the children’s poem “Mary Had a Little Lamb,” originally ...
  • How Geronimo Eluded Death and Capture for 25 Years
    In the summer of 1886, the legendary Apache medicine man and guerrilla warrior Geronimo was being pursued across hostile desert terrain by nearly a quarter of the standing United States Army. Geronimo had reneged on yet another surrender—one of his favorite ploys—and was on the run with a small ...
  • American-Indian Wars
    From the moment English colonists arrived in Jamestown, Virginia, in 1607, they shared an uneasy relationship with the Native Americans (or Indians) who had thrived on the land for thousands of years. At the time, millions of indigenous people were scattered across North America in hundreds of ...
  • Oliver Cromwell
    Oliver Cromwell was a political and military leader in 17th century England who served as Lord Protector, or head of state, of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland and Ireland for a five-year-period until his death in 1658. Cromwell was known for being ruthless in battle, and he twice led ...
  • Thurgood Marshall
    Thurgood Marshall — perhaps best known as the first African-American Supreme Court justice — played an instrumental role in promoting racial equality during the civil rights movement. As a practicing attorney, Marshall argued a record-breaking 32 cases before the Supreme Court, winning 29 of them. ...
  • Paul Revere
    Paul Revere was a colonial Boston silversmith, industrialist, propagandist and patriot immortalized in the Henry Wadsworth Longfellow poem describing Revere’s midnight ride to warn the colonists about a British attack. He gave the local militia a key advantage during the Battles of Lexington and ...
  • Jackie Robinson
    Jackie Robinson was an African-American professional baseball player who broke Major Leagues Baseball’s infamous “color barrier” when he started at first base for the Brooklyn Dodgers on April 15, 1947. Until that time, professional ballplayers of color suited up for teams only in the Negro ...
  • Davy Crockett
    Davy Crockett was a frontiersman, soldier, politician, congressman and prolific storyteller. Known as the “King of the Wild Frontier,” his adventures — both real and fictitious — earned him American folk hero status. BirthplaceDavid Crockett was born in eastern Tennessee on August 17, ...
  • The 1969 Documentary That Tried to Humanize Queen Elizabeth II and the Royal Family
    A well-groomed, staid British family sit around the breakfast table. Two young adult children and their middle-aged parents are dressed formally, without a hair out of place. In a high-pitched voice, the mother tells a funny story about her great-great grandmother, while everyone listens with their ...
  • The First Time the Plague Broke Out in the US, Officials Tried to Deny It
    At the turn of the 20th century, the world was gripped by a plague pandemic that had spread from China to port cities around the globe. So when a 41-year-old San Franciscan named Wong Chut King died of a particularly violent disease in March 1900, there were worries that the pandemic had finally ...
  • 10 Native American Inventions Commonly Used Today
    From the tip of South America to the Arctic, Native Americans developed scores of innovations—from kayaks, protective goggles and baby bottles to birth control, genetically modified food crops and analgesic medications—that enabled them to survive and flourish wherever they lived. In fact, early ...
  • Radio host Don Imus makes offensive remarks about Rutgers' women's basketball team
    On April 4, 2007, syndicated talk radio host Don Imus ignites a firestorm after making racially disparaging remarks about the Rutgers University women’s basketball team, insulting their appearance and tattoos and, most infamously, calling them “nappy-headed hos.” After a nationwide torrent of ...
  • Hank Aaron ties Babe Ruth's home run record
    As the 1974 Major League Baseball season began, all eyes were on Hank Aaron. He had finished 1973 with 713 career home runs, one shy of the all-time record set by Babe Ruth. On April 4, Opening Day, a 39-year-old Aaron sent the very first pitch he saw over the wall, finally tying Ruth and […]
  • British physicist J.J. Thomson announces the discovery of electrons
    On April 30, 1897, British physicist J.J. Thomson announced his discovery that atoms were made up of smaller components. This finding revolutionized the way scientists thought about the atom and had major ramifications for the field of physics. Though Thompson referred to them as "corpuscles," what ...
  • Was Napoleon Short? Origins of the 'Napoleon Complex'
    One of the world’s most instantly recognizable cultural icons, Napoleon Bonaparte is usually depicted with one hand in his waistcoat—and short and aggressive. His supposedly small stature and fiery temper has inspired the term the Napoleon Complex, a popular belief that short men tend to ...
  • King Philip’s War
    King Philip’s War — also known as the First Indian War, the Great Narragansett War or Metacom’s Rebellion — took place in southern New England from 1675 to 1676. It was the Native Americans' last-ditch effort to avoid recognizing English authority and stop English settlement on their ...

Behind the Curtain

September 20, 2019

How Students Feel About Homecoming Spirit Week

September 16, 2019

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End of 1st Semester
The student news site of Clear Lake High School
The student news site of Clear Lake High School