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Lake Reflections

Boys Water Polo
Top 10 NFL Offseason Moves
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  • One Drop at a Time May 20, 2019
  • ITC Fire April 1, 2019
  • Effects of vaping March 28, 2019
  • Juuling/Vaping at CLHS March 27, 2019
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  • 8 Little-Known Facts About the Moon Landing
    It was a feat for the ages. Just seven years before, a young president had challenged the nation to land a man on the moon—not because it was “easy,” as John F. Kennedy said in 1962, but because it was “hard.” By July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong backed down a ladder and onto the moon’s […]
  • The Office of Homeland Security is founded
    The Office of Homeland Security is founded on this day in 2001, less than one month after the September 11 terrorist attacks. Now a cabinet department, Homeland Security is now one of the largest organs of the federal government, charged with preventing terror attacks, border security, ...
  • John Lennon’s "Imagine" is released
    October 11, 1971 sees the release of John Lennon’s “Imagine,” one of the most influential songs of the 20 century. Lennon began writing the song while still a member of the Beatles, at a time when the band had achieved unprecedented popularity but struggled to cope with their new reality. The ...
  • New York Times publishes bombshell investigation into allegations against Harvey Weinstein
    On this day in 2017, The New York Times publishes a detailed investigation into allegations of sexual harassment against film producer Harvey Weinstein. The bombshell report led to Weinstein’s eventual arrest on charges of rape and other sexual misconduct. It has since become recognized as one of ...
  • How John Paul Stevens' Views Evolved Over 34 Years on the Supreme Court
    When John Paul Stevens was nominated to the Supreme Court in the 1970s, he steeled himself for a bombshell from his past as a Seventh Circuit judge. There, he’d authored a dissent that claimed it was legal to prevent married women from becoming flight attendants at United Airlines. That ...
  • 7 Surprising Facts About the Boston Tea Party
    Most Americans can tell you that the first unofficial “declaration of independence” happened in Boston, when a band of tax-hating renegades dumped King George’s beloved tea into the harbor, a spirited act of defiance that united the colonies in revolution. But as with most well-trod origin ...
  • The Amazing Handmade Tech That Powered Apollo 11’s Moon Voyage
    Getting the Apollo 11 astronauts to the moon in July 1969 required the development of an incredible array of innovative high technology, created at a furious pace: the world’s biggest rocket; the world’s smallest, fastest, most nimble computer; the first worldwide, high-speed data network; ...
  • How JFK, LBJ and Nixon All Put Their Stamp on the Apollo 11 Moon Landing
    A little before 11 pm on July 20, 1969, President Nixon sat in his small hideaway office in the Executive Office Building next to the White House. He’d put a lot into NASA’s mission to land on the moon, not the actual development—all of that was done before he took office—but in making sure that […]
  • How the Ancient Greeks Designed the Parthenon to Impress—And Last
    Few monuments in the world are more recognizable than the Parthenon. Sitting atop a limestone hill rising some 500 feet above the Ilissos Valley in Athens, this soaring marble temple built in tribute to the goddess Athena brings the glory of ancient Greece into the modern world. Constructed with ...
  • See Photos of How Astronauts Trained for the Apollo Moon Missions
    How do you prepare to send someone to a place no one has ever gone before? For NASA in the 1960s, the answer was to create simulations that mimicked aspects of what astronauts could expect to encounter. Take gravity, for example. Gravity on the moon is about one-sixth of what it is on Earth. To […]
  • The Spy Who Kept the Cold War From Boiling Over
    In 1984, U.S. spies monitoring the Soviet press found an alarming piece in a Russian magazine. It wasn’t an expose on officials in the Soviet Union or a worrying account about Cold War attitudes toward the United States. Rather, it was a recipe for coot, a small water bird that’s common in Eastern ...
  • Why Was the Electoral College Created?
    Five times in history, presidential candidates have won the popular vote but lost the Electoral College. This has led some to question why Americans use this system to elect their presidents in the first place. Among the many thorny questions debated by the delegates to the 1787 Constitutional ...
  • Construction of the Brooklyn Bridge Took 14 Years—And Multiple Lives
    Fourteen tons of fireworks illuminated the New York night on May 24, 1883, to celebrate the completion of one of the greatest engineering feats of the Gilded Age—the Brooklyn Bridge. Billed as the “Eighth Wonder of the World,” the longest suspension bridge ever built at the time spanned the East ...
  • Sinéad O’Connor tears up a photo of Pope John Paul II on "Saturday Night Live"
    On this day in 1992, Irish musician Sinéad O’Connor stuns the audience at 30 Rockefeller Plaza and viewers across the United States when she tears up a photo of Pope John Paul II during a performance on Saturday Night Live. O’Connor surprised the SNL staff when she opted to sing an acapella version ...
  • George Washington's Final Years—And Sudden, Agonizing Death
    George Washington’s final three years of life were not spent in typically relaxed retirement. Active until his last days at his Mount Vernon estate, Washington focused on making his plantation productive, getting his affairs in order and addressing a dilemma that had nagged at him for ...
  • The U.S. Deported a Million of Its Own Citizens to Mexico During the Great Depression
    In the 1930s, the Los Angeles Welfare Department decided to start deporting hospital patients of Mexican descent. One of the patients was a woman with leprosy who was driven just over the border and left in Mexicali, Mexico. Others had tuberculosis, paralysis, mental illness or problems related to ...
  • Khobar Towers bombing in Saudi Arabia kills 19 U.S. airmen
    On this day in 1996, a tanker truck loaded with 25,000 pounds of explosives rips through the U.S. Air Force military housing complex Khobar Towers in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, killing 19 U.S. airmen and wounding nearly 500 others. The terrorist attack that blew off much of the eight-story Building ...
  • The Soviet Response to the Moon Landing? Denial There Was a Moon Race at All
    You’ve probably heard of conspiracy theories that the moon landing was a hoax (those are false, and easily debunked). But have you heard the one about how the moon race was itself a hoax, because the Soviet Union was never trying to get to the moon in the first place? Or at least, that’s what […]
  • President Carter calls for Olympics to be moved from Moscow
    On January 20, 1980, in a letter to the United States Olympic Committee (USOC) and a television interview, U.S. President Jimmy Carter proposes that the 1980 Summer Olympics be moved from the planned host city, Moscow, if the Soviet Union failed to withdraw its troops from Afghanistan within a ...
Coca-Cola

Men in Black

May 20, 2019

Illuminati

May 20, 2019

Chick-fil-a

Chick-fil-a

May 7, 2019

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Countdown to Summer
The student news site of Clear Lake High School
The student news site of Clear Lake High School